Kevin Earl Dayhoff Art One-half Banana Stems

Kevin Earl Dayhoff Art One-half Banana Stems - www.kevindayhoff.com Runner, writer, artist, fire and police chaplain Mindless ramblings of a runner, journalist & artist: Travel, art, artists, authors, books, newspapers, media, writers and writing, journalists and journalism, reporters and reporting, technology, music, culture, opera... National and International politics www.kevindayhoff.net For community see www.kevindayhoff.org For art, technology, writing, and travel see www.kevindayhoff.com

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Facebook is now offering journalists the same tools as celebrities – or maybe not.


Facebook is now offering journalists the same tools as celebrities – or maybe not.

September 15, 2015 Kevin E. Dayhoff

On September 10, 2015, I was intrigued to read, “Facebook is now offering journalists the same tools as celebrities” by Benjamin Mullin, on Poynter.

The article began, “Pop quiz: What do Kim Kardashian and Bob Woodward have in common?

“If that question were posed Wednesday, the answer might be that both had written books — one about selfies, the other about presidential self-destruction. But as of today, Kardashian and Woodward have something else in common: both have access to the same suite of exclusive social media tools, privileges that have also been extended to thousands of other journalists.

“Earlier today, Facebook announced it was allowing journalists and others with verified profiles to use Mentions, an app originally intended to empower celebrities to manage their social personas. After Mentions launched in 2014, news outlets dutifully chronicled the list of actors, musicians and professional athletes that flocked to the app, then dubbed a “VIP only” service.

“Now, journalists and public figure whose profiles have been verified by Facebook — as indicated by a little blue check mark — will have access to Mentions. Using the app, they can monitor Facebook chatter about various topics and hold question-and-answer sessions from their phones…”


I immediately took the time to process a Facebook request for be verified as a journalist.

All the while, I kept thinking about the Franz Kafka 1925 classic dystopian fiction, “The Trial.”  

My request was immediately denied… This by media that recognized folks such as Kim Kardashian as an accomplished “authentic public figure,” that meets “Facebook's standards for notability…”

Meanwhile I had posted the Poynter article on my Facebook page… To which a journalist friend, Steven R Berryman, on Facebook remarked, “Yeah right Kevin like where are we going to find any journalists anyway?”

To which I responded, “LOL, Steve, apparently Facebook agrees with you and denied my request for verification as a journalist. ‘On Thu, Sep 10, 2015 at 3:10 PM ... Hi Kevin,

‘Thanks for your request. We've reviewed this account and found that it's not eligible for verification at this time.

‘While the profile or Page may represent an authentic public figure, brand, business or organization, verification is also based on Facebook's standards for notability. We hope you continue to connect with and grow your audience on Facebook...’”

To which I responded to Facebook, a faceless existential entity often confused with the enigmatic prosecutorial entity in “The Trial.”

"Hi, Thanks for your response to my request for verification as a journalist. Thank you for your time.

“I sent in my request for verification in response to an article I found in Poynter, ‘Facebook is now offering journalists the same tools as celebrities,’ by Benjamin Mullin, Published Sep. 10, 2015 12:59 pm.


“The article left me with the impression that ‘Facebook's standards for notability,’ now included writing for a major newspaper. Of course, my critics may not feel that I am a journalist and that the Baltimore Sun is not a major newspaper, but I have in fact written for the newspaper for 12 years.

“I would like to qualify for a verified account, so that I and other "journalists may decide to use Facebook as another avenue for reporting and engagement, thereby solidifying the social network’s place as an arbiter of news."
Please advise. Thanks for your time.”

I never heard back from Facebook. No word if the flogger will appear at a later date… now that I have been rendered a first judgement…

Then as failure piled on to failure, I had tried to leave a comment on Poynter and failed… If I had been successful in posting my comment, this is, in part, is what I wanted to say…. I have since added to it, since I did not need to be concerned with brevity…

Days later, I went back to the Poynter article just to confirm as to whether or not I really did read the article or if it was a manifestation of my over-active imagination – and if I had read the article correctly.

I was amused to see a comment, “And this is a good thing?”

At that point, I did notice that my comment was finally published…

Anyway, my elaborated response reads:

Mr. Benjamin Mullin,

Thank you for this article. As a result of your article, I visited the page for Facebook.com/about/mentions and saw that in order to get the “Mentions” app, I needed to be verified on Facebook as a public figure. I immediately applied for a verified account with Facebook, along with a jpg of my government-issued identification card and a link to 12-years of articles in a major U.S. newspaper - - and was promptly denied.

The threshold of my amazement has been moved once again.

Have you applied to be verified as a journalist by Facebook?

Although I have navigated the internet and computers for decades; with Facebook I find myself occasionally adrift in a sea of ever-changing byzantine rules of which I simply lack the sophisticated and intercultural competence to navigate.

I was excited to read your article for many reasons. Time and space do not allow me to elaborate. However, I have worked at my journalism skills all my life. I take great pride in my profession. Yet, I sometimes bristle at whom Facebook has deemed to be worthy of its “standards for notability.”

Let’s just say that I was amazed to find the names Kim Kardashian and Bob Woodward in the same sentence in the context with a discussion about Facebook “allowing journalists and others with verified profiles to use Mentions, an app originally intended to empower celebrities to manage their social personas. After Mentions launched in 2014, news outlets dutifully chronicled the list of actors, musicians and professional athletes that flocked to the app, then dubbed a ‘VIP only’ service.”

The fact that, to date, Mr. Woodward is not considered “public figure” and Ms. Kardashian is – can be fuel for much discussion. Let’s just say that I was happy that the profession of journalism was getting some recognition.

To be certain, I’m not sure that I am looking at Facebook for indemnification for what I have done with my life. I am not always the most confident writer …. And of course, my critics may not feel that I am a journalist and the paper for which I write is not a major newspaper, but I have in fact written for the newspaper for 12 years…

I guess that I was simply excited about “the latest overture from Facebook to the world of media, and [that] it signals that the social media giant is looking to strengthen its position as a destination for news….” I am always looking for new outlets and keep hoping Facebook will grow to be something more than a vehicle for rants or what to have for dinner.

Sometimes the greatest hoax in life is the hope for safety

J.K.'s last words were, "Like a dog!" Just saying
*****

++++++++++++



Kevin Dayhoff Art: http://www.kevindayhoff.com/




New Bedford Herald: http://kbetrue.livejournal.com/


Scribd Kevin Dayhoff: http://www.scribd.com/kdayhoff
Kevin Dayhoff's YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/kevindayhoff

Kevin Dayhoff Banana Stems: http://kevindayhoff.tumblr.com/ 

Google profile: https://profiles.google.com/kevindayhoff/ 


Kevin Earl Dayhoff Art www.kevindayhoff.com: Travel, art, artists, authors, books, newspapers, media, writers and writing, journalists and journalism, reporters and reporting, music, culture, opera... Ad maiorem Dei gloriam inque hominum salutem. “Deadline U.S.A.” 1952. Ed Hutcheson: “That's the press, baby. The press! And there's nothing you can do about it. Nothing!” - See more at: http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/#sthash.4HNLwtfd.dpuf

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.