Kevin Earl Dayhoff Art One-half Banana Stems

Kevin Earl Dayhoff Art One-half Banana Stems - www.kevindayhoff.com Runner, writer, artist, fire and police chaplain Mindless ramblings of a runner, journalist & artist: Travel, art, artists, authors, books, newspapers, media, writers and writing, journalists and journalism, reporters and reporting, technology, music, culture, opera... National and International politics www.kevindayhoff.net For community see www.kevindayhoff.org For art, technology, writing, and travel see www.kevindayhoff.com

Wednesday, June 03, 2015

American writer Elbert Green Hubbard died on the RMS Lusitania on May 7, 1915

American writer Elbert Green Hubbard died on the RMS Lusitania on May 7, 1915 - by Kevin E. Dayhoff http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/2015/06/american-writer-elbert-green-hubbard.html


American writer Elbert Green Hubbard died on the RMS Lusitania on May 7, 1915 by Kevin E. Dayhoff 

Elbert Green Hubbard, June 19, 1856 - May 7, 1915

“God will not look you over for medals, degrees or diplomas but for scars.”
― Elbert Hubbard


"To avoid criticism, do nothing, say nothing, and be nothing." - Elbert Hubbard http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/2015/06/american-writer-elbert-green-hubbard.html

1904 Photo of Mr. Hubbard courtesy of the Library of Congress: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/93508629/

May 7, 2015 Kevin E. Dayhoff - It was 100 years ago that our nation’s literary, cultural and artistic community mourned the death of Elbert Green Hubbard, June 19, 1856 - May 7, 1915, an American philosopher, artist, and writer.

He died on the RMS Lusitania on May 7, 1915, when the ship was sunk by the Germans off the coast of Ireland.

He is well-known for publishing two satirical and witty magazines, “The Philistine,” and “The Fra.”

In addition to remembering him for his quotes, I remember him best as the author of “A Message to Garcia.” One of my favorite quotes is by Mr. Hubbard: “God will not look you over for medals degrees or diplomas, but for scars.”

Not to be overlooked was the not too insignificant matter that he was federally prosecuted and subsequently convicted on January 11, 1913, for circulating "objectionable" matter in violation of the postal laws - - every writer’s nightmare who fears the consequences of writing material that government officials deem not in line with the official viewpoint of the government at the time. Fortunately he received a pardon by President Woodrow Wilson.

Mr. Hubbard is also known for his actions onboard the Lusitania on May 7, 1915, after the ship was struck by a torpedo.

According to a letter written to his son, Elbert Hubbard II dated March 12, 1916, by Ernest C. Cowper, a survivor of the sinking of the Lusitania, found in the papers of Mr. Hubbard collected by the "Elbert Hubbard Papers Manuscript Group #17" at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania; page 3 and 4:

“I cannot say specifically where your father and Mrs. Hubbard were when the torpedoes hit, but I can tell you just what happened after that. They emerged from their room, which was on the port side of the vessel, and came on to the boat-deck. Neither appeared perturbed in the least. Your father and Mrs. Hubbard linked arms—the fashion in which they always walked the deck—and stood apparently wondering what to do. I passed him with a baby which I was taking to a lifeboat when he said, 'Well, Jack, they have got us. They are a damn sight worse than I ever thought they were.'

“They did not move very far away from where they originally stood. As I moved to the other side of the ship, in preparation for a jump when the right moment came, I called to him, 'What are you going to do?' and he just shook his head, while Mrs. Hubbard smiled and said, 'There does not seem to be anything to do.'

“The expression seemed to produce action on the part of your father, for then he did one of the most dramatic things I ever saw done. He simply turned with Mrs. Hubbard and entered a room on the top deck, the door of which was open, and closed it behind him. It was apparent that his idea was that they should die together, and not risk being parted on going into the water.”

#####
++++++++++++



Kevin Dayhoff Art: http://www.kevindayhoff.com/




New Bedford Herald: http://kbetrue.livejournal.com/


Scribd Kevin Dayhoff: http://www.scribd.com/kdayhoff
Kevin Dayhoff's YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/kevindayhoff

Kevin Dayhoff Banana Stems: http://kevindayhoff.tumblr.com/ 

Google profile: https://profiles.google.com/kevindayhoff/ 


Kevin Earl Dayhoff Art www.kevindayhoff.com: Travel, art, artists, authors, books, newspapers, media, writers and writing, journalists and journalism, reporters and reporting, music, culture, opera... Ad maiorem Dei gloriam inque hominum salutem. “Deadline U.S.A.” 1952. Ed Hutcheson: “That's the press, baby. The press! And there's nothing you can do about it. Nothing!” - See more at: http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/#sthash.4HNLwtfd.dpuf

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.