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Wednesday, November 30, 2005

20051130 Westminster, City College set to renew old football ties

Aerial photo of Westminster High School on Longwell Avenue in 1950

See related:

Sports in Carroll County Football Westminster High School


Westminster, City College set to renew old football ties

Westminster Eagle

11/30/2005 By Kevin E. Dayhoff

This Friday at 7 p.m., City College of Baltimore and Westminster High School will face off in the state football semifinals - at Westminster.

The only other time these two teams played each other on the gridiron was 54 years ago, in September 1951.

Two prominent local physicians remember that '51 game well - from opposite sides of the field.

Dr. John Steers Sr., City College class of 1952, played end for the City College Black Knights.

Dr. Dean Griffin, WHS class of 1952, was the team manager for the Westminster Owls.

In September 1951, the Westminster football program was only four years old. Herb Ruby first started Westminster High School football in 1947.

Fortunately, the lights for the field (later named Ruby Field) had been installed the year before or the game may never have happened.

According to Steers, as the bus driver was bringing the City College team up Old Baltimore Pike, (four years before Route 140 opened), "he got lost, and we followed the lights to the school."

It may have been just as well if City had gotten lost, as the Owls came up short in the contest, 20-6, in a game marred by too many fumbles, according to an account by The Sun.

(The 1952 Owl Yearbook notes that the Owls lost 22-6. Whatever ... Westminster lost.)

In 1951, head coach Herb Ruby, backfield coach Fern Hitchcock and line coach Nate Weinstock mentored the Westminster Owls, according to Griffin.

For City, Andy DiFassio was head coach. Steers still keeps in touch with Difassio after all these years, and will have dinner with him this week. Steers is considering inviting him up for this Friday's game, but may re-consider "due to [DiFassio's] age," he said.

Griffin noted that Ruby and Hitchcock were later recognized by the Carroll County Sports Hall of Fame, sponsored by the Rotary Club, for contributions to sports in Carroll County. Nathan Weinstock was a volunteer coach.

Many will remember that Weinstock also owned "Weinstock's Dress Shop" on Westminster's Main Street.

A member of the Owls 1951 football team, Charlie Havens Jr., was also later inducted into the Hall of Fame. (So was his dad, Charlie Havens Sr., a Western Maryland College coach who also played professional football and was an active volunteer in the Westminster Fire Company. Griffin referred to him as a "one-man ambulance crew.")

Both Griffin and Steers remember the game as if it were yesterday.

Early in the first quarter Steers, playing end for the Knights, gathered up a fumble on the Westminster 15-yard line. Two plays later, Dick Whedbee, of City scored on a 13-yard run.

In the September 1951 Sun account, staff writer Edwin H. Brandt wrote: "City scored again after two minutes of the second quarter had gone by when Gene [sic Ð Carl] Fisher, Westminster quarterback, fumbled ... twice in a row. City recovered the second on the 9-yard line and [two plays later] Chuck Doering plunged over É"

"Westminster made its bid to get back into the game," Brandt continued, when "Fullback Al Kelbaugh got his shoulders over the goal line É"

In the third and final score of the game, "Quarterback Jerry Sisson then went around end on the initial play of the last period for the touchdown."

In this year's rematch, Westminster is ranked second in the state, according to a Nov. 23 poll by The Sun, while City is ranked 11th.

Griffin pondered that the 2005 Owl football team, coached by Brad Wilson, may be one of the three best ever fielded by Westminster. The other two teams he mentioned were the 1976 team and 1950 squad, which went 9-1 for the season. (This writer would add the 1981 squad.)

In 1950, Quarterback Jack Bowersox was named "All-Maryland" and halfback Bob Settle and tackle Calvin Dutterer were named "All-County."

The 1951 Owl yearbook notes that the success of the team "was the culmination of a great deal of work on the part of civic-minded citizens of WestminsterÉ"

Today, many "civic-minded" citizens who know their football expect Westminster to go on to win the state championship after they settle a 54-year old score with City College.

Dr. Steers said he is looking forward to the game this Friday, and asked that The Westminster Eagle spread the word for 1951 team members to get in touch with him, so that they may meet at the VFW at 4:40 p.m. for dinner and attend the game together.

It's a shame they'll all witness City College lose.

Go Owls.

Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster Maryland USA.

www.kevindayhoff.net

E-mail him at: kdayhoff AT carr.org or kevindayhoff AT gmail.com

His columns and articles appear in The Tentacle - www.thetentacle.com; Westminster Eagle Opinion; www.thewestminstereagle.com and Winchester Report.

Copyright 1998-2007 MyWebPal.com. All rights reserved.
Contact us at webmaster@mywebpal.com
All other trademarks and Registered trademarks are property
of their respective owners.

History Carroll Co., History Westminster, People Carroll County, Sports in Carroll County Football, Sports in Carroll County Football Westminster High School, Westminster Eagle

20051130 Westminster, City College set to renew old football ties

Aerial photo of Westminster High School on Longwell Avenue in 1950

Westminster, City College set to renew old football ties

Westminster Eagle

11/30/2005 By Kevin E. Dayhoff

This Friday at 7 p.m., City College of Baltimore and Westminster High School will face off in the state football semifinals - at Westminster.

The only other time these two teams played each other on the gridiron was 54 years ago, in September 1951.

Two prominent local physicians remember that '51 game well - from opposite sides of the field.

Dr. John Steers Sr., City College class of 1952, played end for the City College Black Knights.

Dr. Dean Griffin, WHS class of 1952, was the team manager for the Westminster Owls.

In September 1951, the Westminster football program was only four years old. Herb Ruby first started Westminster High School football in 1947.

Fortunately, the lights for the field (later named Ruby Field) had been installed the year before or the game may never have happened.

According to Steers, as the bus driver was bringing the City College team up Old Baltimore Pike, (four years before Route 140 opened), "he got lost, and we followed the lights to the school."

It may have been just as well if City had gotten lost, as the Owls came up short in the contest, 20-6, in a game marred by too many fumbles, according to an account by The Sun.

(The 1952 Owl Yearbook notes that the Owls lost 22-6. Whatever ... Westminster lost.)

In 1951, head coach Herb Ruby, backfield coach Fern Hitchcock and line coach Nate Weinstock mentored the Westminster Owls, according to Griffin.

For City, Andy DiFassio was head coach. Steers still keeps in touch with Difassio after all these years, and will have dinner with him this week. Steers is considering inviting him up for this Friday's game, but may re-consider "due to [DiFassio's] age," he said.

Griffin noted that Ruby and Hitchcock were later recognized by the Carroll County Sports Hall of Fame, sponsored by the Rotary Club, for contributions to sports in Carroll County. Nathan Weinstock was a volunteer coach.

Many will remember that Weinstock also owned "Weinstock's Dress Shop" on Westminster's Main Street.

A member of the Owls 1951 football team, Charlie Havens Jr., was also later inducted into the Hall of Fame. (So was his dad, Charlie Havens Sr., a Western Maryland College coach who also played professional football and was an active volunteer in the Westminster Fire Company. Griffin referred to him as a "one-man ambulance crew.")

Both Griffin and Steers remember the game as if it were yesterday.

Early in the first quarter Steers, playing end for the Knights, gathered up a fumble on the Westminster 15-yard line. Two plays later, Dick Whedbee, of City scored on a 13-yard run.

In the September 1951 Sun account, staff writer Edwin H. Brandt wrote: "City scored again after two minutes of the second quarter had gone by when Gene [sic Ð Carl] Fisher, Westminster quarterback, fumbled ... twice in a row. City recovered the second on the 9-yard line and [two plays later] Chuck Doering plunged over É"

"Westminster made its bid to get back into the game," Brandt continued, when "Fullback Al Kelbaugh got his shoulders over the goal line É"

In the third and final score of the game, "Quarterback Jerry Sisson then went around end on the initial play of the last period for the touchdown."

In this year's rematch, Westminster is ranked second in the state, according to a Nov. 23 poll by The Sun, while City is ranked 11th.

Griffin pondered that the 2005 Owl football team, coached by Brad Wilson, may be one of the three best ever fielded by Westminster. The other two teams he mentioned were the 1976 team and 1950 squad, which went 9-1 for the season. (This writer would add the 1981 squad.)

In 1950, Quarterback Jack Bowersox was named "All-Maryland" and halfback Bob Settle and tackle Calvin Dutterer were named "All-County."

The 1951 Owl yearbook notes that the success of the team "was the culmination of a great deal of work on the part of civic-minded citizens of WestminsterÉ"

Today, many "civic-minded" citizens who know their football expect Westminster to go on to win the state championship after they settle a 54-year old score with City College.

Dr. Steers said he is looking forward to the game this Friday, and asked that The Westminster Eagle spread the word for 1951 team members to get in touch with him, so that they may meet at the VFW at 4:40 p.m. for dinner and attend the game together.

It's a shame they'll all witness City College lose.

Go Owls.

Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster Maryland USA.

www.kevindayhoff.net

E-mail him at: kdayhoff AT carr.org or kevindayhoff AT gmail.com

His columns and articles appear in The Tentacle - www.thetentacle.com; Westminster Eagle Opinion; www.thewestminstereagle.com and Winchester Report.

Copyright 1998-2007 MyWebPal.com. All rights reserved.
Contact us at webmaster@mywebpal.com
All other trademarks and Registered trademarks are property
of their respective owners.

History Carroll Co., History Westminster, People Carroll County, Sports in Carroll County Football, Sports in Carroll County Football Westminster High School, Westminster Eagle

20051129 Westminster Eagle: WHS City College set to renew old football ties

EAGLE EXTRA: Westminster, City College set to renew old football ties

(Related – see: Sports in Carroll County Football Westminster High School

By Kevin E. Dayhoff – originally published in the Westminster Eagle on 11/29/05

This Friday at 7 p.m., City College of Baltimore and Westminster High School will face off in the state football semifinals — at Westminster.

The only other time these two teams played each other on the gridiron was 54 years ago, in September 1951.

Two prominent local physicians remember that ’51 game well — from opposite sides of the field.

Dr. John Steers Sr., City College class of 1952, played end for the City College Black Knights.

Dr. Dean Griffin, WHS class of 1952, was the team manager for the Westminster Owls.

In September 1951, the Westminster football program was only four years old. Herb Ruby first started Westminster High School football in 1947.

Fortunately, the lights for the field (later named Ruby Field) had been installed the year before or the game may never have happened.

According to Steers, as the bus driver was bringing the City College team up Old Baltimore Pike, (four years before Route 140 opened), “he got lost, and we followed the lights to the school.”

It may have been just as well if City had gotten lost, as the Owls came up short in the contest, 20-6, in a game marred by too many fumbles, according to an account by The Sun.

(The 1952 Owl Yearbook notes that the Owls lost 22-6. Whatever ... Westminster lost.)

In 1951, head coach Herb Ruby, backfield coach Fern Hitchcock and line coach Nate Weinstock mentored the Westminster Owls, according to Griffin.

For City, Andy DiFassio was head coach. Steers still keeps in touch with Difassio after all these years, and will have dinner with him this week. Steers is considering inviting him up for this Friday’s game, but may re-consider “due to [DiFassio’s] age,” he said.

Griffin noted that Ruby and Hitchcock were later recognized by the Carroll County Sports Hall of Fame, sponsored by the Rotary Club, for contributions to sports in Carroll County. Nathan Weinstock was a volunteer coach.

Many will remember that Weinstock also owned “Weinstock’s Dress Shop” on Westminster’s Main Street.

A member of the Owls 1951 football team, Charlie Havens Jr., was also later inducted into the Hall of Fame. (So was his dad, Charlie Havens Sr., a Western Maryland College coach who also played professional football and was an active volunteer in the Westminster Fire Company. Griffin referred to him as a “one-man ambulance crew.”)

Both Griffin and Steers remember the game as if it were yesterday.

Early in the first quarter Steers, playing end for the Knights, gathered up a fumble on the Westminster 15-yard line. Two plays later, Dick Whedbee, of City scored on a 13-yard run.

In the September 1951 Sun account, staff writer Edwin H. Brandt wrote: “City scored again after two minutes of the second quarter had gone by when Gene [sic – Carl] Fisher, Westminster quarterback, fumbled ... twice in a row. City recovered the second on the 9-yard line and [two plays later] Chuck Doering plunged over …”

Westminster made its bid to get back into the game,” Brandt continued, when “Fullback Al Kelbaugh got his shoulders over the goal line …”

In the third and final score of the game, “Quarterback Jerry Sisson then went around end on the initial play of the last period for the touchdown.”

In this year’s rematch, Westminster is ranked second in the state, according to a Nov. 23 poll by The Sun, while City is ranked 11th.

Griffin pondered that the 2005 Owl football team, coached by Brad Wilson, may be one of the three best ever fielded by Westminster. The other two teams he mentioned were the 1976 team and 1950 squad, which went 9-1 for the season. (This writer would add the 1981 squad.)

In 1950, Quarterback Jack Bowersox was named “All-Maryland” and halfback Bob Settle and tackle Calvin Dutterer were named “All-County.”

The 1951 Owl yearbook notes that the success of the team “was the culmination of a great deal of work on the part of civic-minded citizens of Westminster…”

Today, many “civic-minded” citizens who know their football expect Westminster to go on to win the state championship after they settle a 54- year old score with City College.

Dr. Steers said he is looking forward to the game this Friday, and asked that The Westminster Eagle spread the word for 1951 team members to get in touch with him, so that they may meet at the VFW at 4:40 p.m. for dinner and attend the game together.

It’s a shame they’ll all witness City College lose.

Go Owls.

Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster. E-mail him at: kdayhoff AT carr dot org

©2004 MyWebPal.com. All rights reserved.
Contact us at webmaster@mywebpal.com
All other trademarks and Registered trademarks are property
of their respective owners.

Thursday, November 24, 2005

20051123 Happy Thanksgiving WE


Happy Thanksgiving WE

Westminster Eagle

“Happy Thanksgiving”

November 23, 2005 by Kevin Dayhoff (619 words)

Tomorrow is Thanksgiving. Please celebrate this holiday as quickly as possible before the ACLU finds out that it is an historic American event steeped in wholesome family values and files suit.

This Thanksgiving we have many things for which to be thankful. As with any holiday season, there are always the occasional anxieties and mishaps. Above and beyond the fact that this is the first Thanksgiving Martha Stewart is out of the big house and I for one, am quite concerned that she will show up for Thanksgiving dinner; this past week was long and tough.

Always wanting to be a gracious host and in honor of Ms. Stewart, I stayed up all night with Westminster Eagle editor Jim Joyner and Eagle reporter Heidi Schroeder and printed this edition of The Westminster Eagle on hand made paper. For ink, we used a mixture of white grapes and blackberries, which we picked and crushed last week just for fun.

Celebrating the beginning of the holiday season, I retrieved all the Christmas and Thanksgiving decorations out of the attic and set them in the front yard. I found a great old Santa Claus from the early 1900s, and promptly staked it prominently in the front yard.

I decided to set out paper bag luminaries in homage to Ms. Stewart. While testing the luminaries, the gosh darn lunch bag went up in flames; set fire to the leaves and torched Santa Claus. You’ll read all about it tomorrow in the newspaper: “Artist, formerly known as Mayor Burns Santa Claus At The Stake – Local Officials Outraged.”

Then I wanted to go cut a fresh Christmas tree. My old trusty chainsaw needs replacing and since it was my wife’s birthday last week, I decided to get her a chainsaw for her birthday. That’s when I found out that Maryland is considering a seven day waiting period on the purchase of a chainsaw. When I finally got to the Christmas tree lot – I was dismayed to find local environmentalists were protesting the cutting of Christmas trees this year.

Afterwards, in honor of Ms. Stewart, I traveled through town, (protected by a Salad Shooter and a big bag of hard carrots) and re-arranged the recyclables in everyone’s recycling bin. I arranged them in alphabetical order and according to the color of the front porch.

Speaking of carrots, for unknown reasons, squash is served in many households on Thanksgiving. As much as I like vegetables, one food that does not exist on the Dayhoff’s Nutrition Pyramid (DNP) is squash. God created the squash as a joke. The word “squash” is Native-American for “mud disguised as plant.” Numerous attempts to improve the mud-like taste and texture of squash with herbs and spices manage to get squash to taste like seasoned and spiced mud. Just say so no to squash.

On a serious note - Let our Thanksgiving be revealed in the compassionate support our community renders to fellow citizens who are less fortunate. As we begin the holiday season, let us reach out with care to those in need of food, shelter, and words of hope. May we remember our men and women in uniform, who are in harm’s way, defending our freedom to enjoy this great country and a safe holiday. As we gather with our families over a Thanksgiving meal, may we ask that we be given patience, resolve, and wisdom in all that lies ahead for our great nation.

On this Thanksgiving weekend, shop ‘till you drop and be ever thankful that we can laugh, enjoy our families, revel in our freedoms, celebrate our great community and be stronger because of our differences. From our house to yours: Happy halidaze!

You can have my squash.

Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster. E-mail him at: kdayhoff@carr.org
####

Wednesday, November 16, 2005

20051116 Business Associations, Marines and Veterans

Business Associations, Marines, and Veterans

(Includes a brief history of the beginnings of the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce)

This column first appeared in the Westminster Eagle on November 16, 2005

http://news.mywebpal.com/news_tool_v2.cfm?pnpid=978&show=archivedetails&ArchiveID=1147786&om=1

This version is only different in that I added the footnote for the July 25th, 1924 Democratic Advocate article that I reference in the column…

November 16, 2005 by © Kevin Dayhoff (646 words)


There have been several events in the last several weeks that have kept me busy answering questions. In this short amount of space I’ll try and answer everyone’s questions.

“When did the Chamber of Commerce begin?” The first meeting of the Westminster Chamber of Commerce took place on Wednesday, July 23, 1924. This organization became the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce on January 1, 1973.

According to an article in the Democratic Advocate on July 25, 1924
[1], T. W. Mather, Jr., Charles W. Klee and C. Edgar Nusbaum called a meeting of “75 citizens” at the Westminster Fire Hall on Wednesday afternoon, July 23, 1924 “to consider and hear the views of the business men as to the advisability of forming a Chamber of Commerce for this city.” Officers elected during the meeting were: President, C. Edgar Nusbaum; Vice President, Miller Richardson; Executive Committee, Joseph Mathias, Carroll Albaugh, D. S. Gehr, W. H. Davis, William N. Keefer, Joseph E. Hunter and T. W. Mather, Jr.

Yes, according to a history of the Chamber written by Diana Scott, the Chamber did, at one time, maintain an office in Westminster City Hall. I should also note that the Carroll County Public Schools also maintained their offices in City Hall many years ago.


More research is needed as to what was the first “business association” in Carroll County? The Chamber was formed 26 years after another business organization in Westminster called the “Retailers' Association of Westminster, Maryland” formed on April 6, 1898 “for the purpose of the development and growth of the city and for mutual protection” against the railroad.


On April 9, 1898, the Democratic Advocate mentions that after the first meeting of the Retailers’ Association, a second meeting was to take place Monday, April 11, 1898. Of note is the fact that members of the “Merchants and Manufacturers Association” were invited. Apparently this association pre-dated the Retailers’ Association? A quick review of a Westminster directory published on January 1, 1887 by the Democratic Advocate, has no mention of any merchant’s association.

As for the many questions about Veteran’s Day: For this column, all this writer has to say about protesting for or against any war is that such protests are a cherished American right, for which men and women have made the ultimate sacrifice. Our First Amendment rights are their rights, too.

On Friday, October 3, 1862, The American Sentinel wrote a lengthy editorial commenting on the number of Carroll citizens who were seeking medical deferments to avoid the Civil War draft. The Sentinel referred to this phenomenon the "Democratic Anti-War Fever" and remarked: “It has never been known to prove fatal, nor even affect the appetite, but always resulting in a total destruction of the organ of patriotism.”


On the other hand, it was in April 1898 that the tension over the fate of Cuba erupted into the Spanish-American War. In an April 19, 1998 article in the Carroll County Times, Jay Graybeal wrote that “local reformer” Mary B. Shellman, Georgia Buckingham and Denton Gehr promoted the cause of “Free Cuba” in 1898 “in a play at the Westminster Odd Fellows Hall.”

As for a question about the U.S. Marine Corps birthday: it is the day before Veteran’s Day. On November 10, 1775 the Continental Congress commissioned Samuel Nicholas to raise several Battalions of Marines. Nicholas established a recruiting station at “Tun Tavern” in Philadelphia.

Yes, Carroll County does have a place in Marine Corps history. According to a July 7, 1996 article by Jay Graybeal in the Carroll County Times, on June 11, 1898, the first Marine killed in the Spanish-American War was from Carroll County. Sgt. Charles H. Smith was killed during the capture of Guantanamo Bay and “… buried with full military honors in Deer Park Methodist Cemetery near his parent's home in Smallwood…. More than 2,000 people attended the funeral.”

Next question?

Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster. E-mail him at:
kdayhoff@carr.org


####

[1] To Have Chamber Of Commerce—At the call of T. W. Mather, Jr., Charles W. Klee and C. Edgar Nusbaum, well known business men and boosters of Westminster, about 75 citizens from this city gathered at the Firemen's building, Wednesday afternoon to consider and hear the views of the business men as to the advisability of forming a Chamber of Commerce for this city. The meeting was opened by electing William T. Mather, Jr., temporary chairman, and J. Thomas Anders secretary. The chairman asked for the men to express themselves on the subject, which brought forth opinions of a number, which lead to the election of officers. The officers elected are to make plans and set the wheels in motion for a successful beginning of the organization. They are President, C. Edgar Nusbaum; Vice President, Miller Richardson; Executive Committee, Joseph Mathias, Carroll Albaugh, D. S. Gehr, W. H. Davis, William N. Keefer, Joseph E. Hunter and T. W. Mather, Jr. Democratic Advocate, July 25, 1924.