Kevin Earl Dayhoff Art One-half Banana Stems

Kevin Earl Dayhoff Art One-half Banana Stems - www.kevindayhoff.com Runner, writer, artist, fire and police chaplain Mindless ramblings of a runner, journalist & artist: Travel, art, artists, authors, books, newspapers, media, writers and writing, journalists and journalism, reporters and reporting, technology, music, culture, opera... National and International politics www.kevindayhoff.net For community see www.kevindayhoff.org For art, technology, writing, and travel see www.kevindayhoff.com

Monday, December 26, 2005

Merry Christmas


Merry Christmas from our family to yours.

Speaking of family, it is really hard to write a column when your wife keeps playing “I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas”, (by Gayla Peevey, 1953) on the computer next to you. “I want a hippopotamus for Christmas; I don't think Santa Claus will mind, do you? He won't have to use our dirty chimney flue; Just bring him through the front door, that's the easy thing to do.”

Talk with you later. Many thanks to Rosa's fiance, (my nephew,) Frank Babylon for helping me set up this site.

KDDC 20051226

Thursday, December 22, 2005

Kevin Dayhoff Contact info


Kevin Dayhoff Contact info


December 21, 2005 December 3, 2008

"Life has a value only when it has something valuable as its object.” HEGEL, Introduction to Philosophy of History (1852)

Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster. E-mail him at: kdayhoff AT carr.org.

Questions and feedback are always welcome and greatly appreciated. Email is best. Please be sure to put the word “Soundtrack” in the subject line. I read all of my mail, but cannot always respond due to time constraints.

Anonymous mail is forwarded to the Department of Homeland Security (please include your phone number).

All mail is subject to print, including your name. However, if you don't want me to publish your e-mail, or if you would like to remain anonymous, just let me know.

The statements made on this web site reflect the personal opinions of the author. All opinions and any and all mistakes that may appear in this blog are my fault and mine alone and are not in any way shape or form made in any official capacity or any past, present or future employers.

This blog is written for human consumption; however, it has only been tested on anthropomorphic replicants and android sheep. The Food and Drug Administration wanted it to be tested on animals. However, the animal rights activists protested, forcing me to abandon testing and release the distressed critters. I released them in the lobby of the animal rights office. I figured those friendly folks could best take care of the mice and we all shared a common goal – that the mice be free.

Therefore this material has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The long-term effects of reading this material remain uncertain. Please proceed at your own risk.

Unless noted, content is © Copyrighted to Kevin Dayhoff with all rights reserved.

All information is peripatetically verified when possible, cited as appropriate and applied in the real world at your own risk (except for insights gathered at séances at Barbra Streisand's house). If you find a mistake, let me know and I will correct it. Remember, not all potatoes can swim; always keep plenty of ice cream available and do not run with sharp objects in your hands.

©2006 Kevin Dayhoff All rights reserved.

All other trademarks and Registered trademarks are property of their respective owners.

Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster Maryland USA.

E-mail him at: kdayhoff@carr.org

Other columns and materials may be found at:

The Tentacle http://www.thetentacle.com/

Westminster and Sunday Carroll Eagle Opinion http://explorecarroll.com/opinion-talk/

http://www.kevindayhoff.com/ has moved to http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/

http://kevindayhoffwestgov-net.blogspot.com/

Westminster Maryland Online http://kevindayhoffwestgov-net.blogspot.com/

Associated Content page

Facebook

New Bedford Herald http://kbetrue.livejournal.com/

Dayhoff art at McNulty’s Gizmos

Dayhoff bio and disclosures

20081203 20051221 Kevin Dayhoff Contact info

Wednesday, December 21, 2005

Kevin Dayhoff Contact info


Kevin Dayhoff Contact info

"Life has a value only when it has something valuable as its object.” HEGEL, Introduction to Philosophy of History (1852)

Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster. E-mail him at: kdayhoff AT carr.org.

Questions and feedback are always welcome and greatly appreciated. Email is best. Please be sure to put the word “kdart” in the subject line. I read all of my mail, but cannot always respond due to time constraints.

Anonymous mail is forwarded to the Department of Homeland Security (please include your phone number).

All mail is subject to print, including your name. However, if you don't want me to publish your e-mail, or if you would like to remain anonymous, just let me know.

The statements made on this web site reflect the personal opinions of the author. All opinions and any and all mistakes that may appear in this blog are my fault and mine alone and are not in any way shape or form made in any official capacity or any past, present or future employers.

This blog is written for human consumption; however, it has only been tested on anthropomorphic replicants and android sheep. The Food and Drug Administration wanted it to be tested on animals. However, the animal rights activists protested, forcing me to abandon testing and release the distressed critters. I released them in the lobby of the animal rights office. I figured those friendly folks could best take care of the mice and we all shared a common goal – that the mice be free.

Therefore this material has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The long-term effects of reading this material remain uncertain. Please proceed at your own risk.

Unless noted, content is © Copyrighted to Kevin Dayhoff with all rights reserved.

All information is peripatetically verified when possible, cited as appropriate and applied in the real world at your own risk (except for insights gathered at séances at Barbra Streisand's house). If you find a mistake, let me know and I will correct it. Remember, not all potatoes can swim; always keep plenty of ice cream available and do not run with sharp objects in your hands.

©2006 Kevin Dayhoff All rights reserved.

All other trademarks and Registered trademarks are property of their respective owners.

Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster Maryland USA.

E-mail him at: kdayhoff@carr.org

Other columns and materials may be found at:

The Tentacle http://www.thetentacle.com/

Westminster and Sunday Carroll Eagle Opinion http://explorecarroll.com/opinion-talk/

http://www.kevindayhoff.com/ has moved to http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/

http://kevindayhoffwestgov-net.blogspot.com/

Westminster Maryland Online http://kevindayhoffwestgov-net.blogspot.com/

Associated Content page

Facebook

New Bedford Herald http://kbetrue.livejournal.com/

Dayhoff art at McNulty’s Gizmos

Dayhoff bio and disclosures

20081203 20051221 Kevin Dayhoff Contact info

Wednesday, November 30, 2005

20051130 Westminster, City College set to renew old football ties

Aerial photo of Westminster High School on Longwell Avenue in 1950

See related:

Sports in Carroll County Football Westminster High School


Westminster, City College set to renew old football ties

Westminster Eagle

11/30/2005 By Kevin E. Dayhoff

This Friday at 7 p.m., City College of Baltimore and Westminster High School will face off in the state football semifinals - at Westminster.

The only other time these two teams played each other on the gridiron was 54 years ago, in September 1951.

Two prominent local physicians remember that '51 game well - from opposite sides of the field.

Dr. John Steers Sr., City College class of 1952, played end for the City College Black Knights.

Dr. Dean Griffin, WHS class of 1952, was the team manager for the Westminster Owls.

In September 1951, the Westminster football program was only four years old. Herb Ruby first started Westminster High School football in 1947.

Fortunately, the lights for the field (later named Ruby Field) had been installed the year before or the game may never have happened.

According to Steers, as the bus driver was bringing the City College team up Old Baltimore Pike, (four years before Route 140 opened), "he got lost, and we followed the lights to the school."

It may have been just as well if City had gotten lost, as the Owls came up short in the contest, 20-6, in a game marred by too many fumbles, according to an account by The Sun.

(The 1952 Owl Yearbook notes that the Owls lost 22-6. Whatever ... Westminster lost.)

In 1951, head coach Herb Ruby, backfield coach Fern Hitchcock and line coach Nate Weinstock mentored the Westminster Owls, according to Griffin.

For City, Andy DiFassio was head coach. Steers still keeps in touch with Difassio after all these years, and will have dinner with him this week. Steers is considering inviting him up for this Friday's game, but may re-consider "due to [DiFassio's] age," he said.

Griffin noted that Ruby and Hitchcock were later recognized by the Carroll County Sports Hall of Fame, sponsored by the Rotary Club, for contributions to sports in Carroll County. Nathan Weinstock was a volunteer coach.

Many will remember that Weinstock also owned "Weinstock's Dress Shop" on Westminster's Main Street.

A member of the Owls 1951 football team, Charlie Havens Jr., was also later inducted into the Hall of Fame. (So was his dad, Charlie Havens Sr., a Western Maryland College coach who also played professional football and was an active volunteer in the Westminster Fire Company. Griffin referred to him as a "one-man ambulance crew.")

Both Griffin and Steers remember the game as if it were yesterday.

Early in the first quarter Steers, playing end for the Knights, gathered up a fumble on the Westminster 15-yard line. Two plays later, Dick Whedbee, of City scored on a 13-yard run.

In the September 1951 Sun account, staff writer Edwin H. Brandt wrote: "City scored again after two minutes of the second quarter had gone by when Gene [sic Ð Carl] Fisher, Westminster quarterback, fumbled ... twice in a row. City recovered the second on the 9-yard line and [two plays later] Chuck Doering plunged over É"

"Westminster made its bid to get back into the game," Brandt continued, when "Fullback Al Kelbaugh got his shoulders over the goal line É"

In the third and final score of the game, "Quarterback Jerry Sisson then went around end on the initial play of the last period for the touchdown."

In this year's rematch, Westminster is ranked second in the state, according to a Nov. 23 poll by The Sun, while City is ranked 11th.

Griffin pondered that the 2005 Owl football team, coached by Brad Wilson, may be one of the three best ever fielded by Westminster. The other two teams he mentioned were the 1976 team and 1950 squad, which went 9-1 for the season. (This writer would add the 1981 squad.)

In 1950, Quarterback Jack Bowersox was named "All-Maryland" and halfback Bob Settle and tackle Calvin Dutterer were named "All-County."

The 1951 Owl yearbook notes that the success of the team "was the culmination of a great deal of work on the part of civic-minded citizens of WestminsterÉ"

Today, many "civic-minded" citizens who know their football expect Westminster to go on to win the state championship after they settle a 54-year old score with City College.

Dr. Steers said he is looking forward to the game this Friday, and asked that The Westminster Eagle spread the word for 1951 team members to get in touch with him, so that they may meet at the VFW at 4:40 p.m. for dinner and attend the game together.

It's a shame they'll all witness City College lose.

Go Owls.

Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster Maryland USA.

www.kevindayhoff.net

E-mail him at: kdayhoff AT carr.org or kevindayhoff AT gmail.com

His columns and articles appear in The Tentacle - www.thetentacle.com; Westminster Eagle Opinion; www.thewestminstereagle.com and Winchester Report.

Copyright 1998-2007 MyWebPal.com. All rights reserved.
Contact us at webmaster@mywebpal.com
All other trademarks and Registered trademarks are property
of their respective owners.

History Carroll Co., History Westminster, People Carroll County, Sports in Carroll County Football, Sports in Carroll County Football Westminster High School, Westminster Eagle

20051130 Westminster, City College set to renew old football ties

Aerial photo of Westminster High School on Longwell Avenue in 1950

Westminster, City College set to renew old football ties

Westminster Eagle

11/30/2005 By Kevin E. Dayhoff

This Friday at 7 p.m., City College of Baltimore and Westminster High School will face off in the state football semifinals - at Westminster.

The only other time these two teams played each other on the gridiron was 54 years ago, in September 1951.

Two prominent local physicians remember that '51 game well - from opposite sides of the field.

Dr. John Steers Sr., City College class of 1952, played end for the City College Black Knights.

Dr. Dean Griffin, WHS class of 1952, was the team manager for the Westminster Owls.

In September 1951, the Westminster football program was only four years old. Herb Ruby first started Westminster High School football in 1947.

Fortunately, the lights for the field (later named Ruby Field) had been installed the year before or the game may never have happened.

According to Steers, as the bus driver was bringing the City College team up Old Baltimore Pike, (four years before Route 140 opened), "he got lost, and we followed the lights to the school."

It may have been just as well if City had gotten lost, as the Owls came up short in the contest, 20-6, in a game marred by too many fumbles, according to an account by The Sun.

(The 1952 Owl Yearbook notes that the Owls lost 22-6. Whatever ... Westminster lost.)

In 1951, head coach Herb Ruby, backfield coach Fern Hitchcock and line coach Nate Weinstock mentored the Westminster Owls, according to Griffin.

For City, Andy DiFassio was head coach. Steers still keeps in touch with Difassio after all these years, and will have dinner with him this week. Steers is considering inviting him up for this Friday's game, but may re-consider "due to [DiFassio's] age," he said.

Griffin noted that Ruby and Hitchcock were later recognized by the Carroll County Sports Hall of Fame, sponsored by the Rotary Club, for contributions to sports in Carroll County. Nathan Weinstock was a volunteer coach.

Many will remember that Weinstock also owned "Weinstock's Dress Shop" on Westminster's Main Street.

A member of the Owls 1951 football team, Charlie Havens Jr., was also later inducted into the Hall of Fame. (So was his dad, Charlie Havens Sr., a Western Maryland College coach who also played professional football and was an active volunteer in the Westminster Fire Company. Griffin referred to him as a "one-man ambulance crew.")

Both Griffin and Steers remember the game as if it were yesterday.

Early in the first quarter Steers, playing end for the Knights, gathered up a fumble on the Westminster 15-yard line. Two plays later, Dick Whedbee, of City scored on a 13-yard run.

In the September 1951 Sun account, staff writer Edwin H. Brandt wrote: "City scored again after two minutes of the second quarter had gone by when Gene [sic Ð Carl] Fisher, Westminster quarterback, fumbled ... twice in a row. City recovered the second on the 9-yard line and [two plays later] Chuck Doering plunged over É"

"Westminster made its bid to get back into the game," Brandt continued, when "Fullback Al Kelbaugh got his shoulders over the goal line É"

In the third and final score of the game, "Quarterback Jerry Sisson then went around end on the initial play of the last period for the touchdown."

In this year's rematch, Westminster is ranked second in the state, according to a Nov. 23 poll by The Sun, while City is ranked 11th.

Griffin pondered that the 2005 Owl football team, coached by Brad Wilson, may be one of the three best ever fielded by Westminster. The other two teams he mentioned were the 1976 team and 1950 squad, which went 9-1 for the season. (This writer would add the 1981 squad.)

In 1950, Quarterback Jack Bowersox was named "All-Maryland" and halfback Bob Settle and tackle Calvin Dutterer were named "All-County."

The 1951 Owl yearbook notes that the success of the team "was the culmination of a great deal of work on the part of civic-minded citizens of WestminsterÉ"

Today, many "civic-minded" citizens who know their football expect Westminster to go on to win the state championship after they settle a 54-year old score with City College.

Dr. Steers said he is looking forward to the game this Friday, and asked that The Westminster Eagle spread the word for 1951 team members to get in touch with him, so that they may meet at the VFW at 4:40 p.m. for dinner and attend the game together.

It's a shame they'll all witness City College lose.

Go Owls.

Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster Maryland USA.

www.kevindayhoff.net

E-mail him at: kdayhoff AT carr.org or kevindayhoff AT gmail.com

His columns and articles appear in The Tentacle - www.thetentacle.com; Westminster Eagle Opinion; www.thewestminstereagle.com and Winchester Report.

Copyright 1998-2007 MyWebPal.com. All rights reserved.
Contact us at webmaster@mywebpal.com
All other trademarks and Registered trademarks are property
of their respective owners.

History Carroll Co., History Westminster, People Carroll County, Sports in Carroll County Football, Sports in Carroll County Football Westminster High School, Westminster Eagle

20051129 Westminster Eagle: WHS City College set to renew old football ties

EAGLE EXTRA: Westminster, City College set to renew old football ties

(Related – see: Sports in Carroll County Football Westminster High School

By Kevin E. Dayhoff – originally published in the Westminster Eagle on 11/29/05

This Friday at 7 p.m., City College of Baltimore and Westminster High School will face off in the state football semifinals — at Westminster.

The only other time these two teams played each other on the gridiron was 54 years ago, in September 1951.

Two prominent local physicians remember that ’51 game well — from opposite sides of the field.

Dr. John Steers Sr., City College class of 1952, played end for the City College Black Knights.

Dr. Dean Griffin, WHS class of 1952, was the team manager for the Westminster Owls.

In September 1951, the Westminster football program was only four years old. Herb Ruby first started Westminster High School football in 1947.

Fortunately, the lights for the field (later named Ruby Field) had been installed the year before or the game may never have happened.

According to Steers, as the bus driver was bringing the City College team up Old Baltimore Pike, (four years before Route 140 opened), “he got lost, and we followed the lights to the school.”

It may have been just as well if City had gotten lost, as the Owls came up short in the contest, 20-6, in a game marred by too many fumbles, according to an account by The Sun.

(The 1952 Owl Yearbook notes that the Owls lost 22-6. Whatever ... Westminster lost.)

In 1951, head coach Herb Ruby, backfield coach Fern Hitchcock and line coach Nate Weinstock mentored the Westminster Owls, according to Griffin.

For City, Andy DiFassio was head coach. Steers still keeps in touch with Difassio after all these years, and will have dinner with him this week. Steers is considering inviting him up for this Friday’s game, but may re-consider “due to [DiFassio’s] age,” he said.

Griffin noted that Ruby and Hitchcock were later recognized by the Carroll County Sports Hall of Fame, sponsored by the Rotary Club, for contributions to sports in Carroll County. Nathan Weinstock was a volunteer coach.

Many will remember that Weinstock also owned “Weinstock’s Dress Shop” on Westminster’s Main Street.

A member of the Owls 1951 football team, Charlie Havens Jr., was also later inducted into the Hall of Fame. (So was his dad, Charlie Havens Sr., a Western Maryland College coach who also played professional football and was an active volunteer in the Westminster Fire Company. Griffin referred to him as a “one-man ambulance crew.”)

Both Griffin and Steers remember the game as if it were yesterday.

Early in the first quarter Steers, playing end for the Knights, gathered up a fumble on the Westminster 15-yard line. Two plays later, Dick Whedbee, of City scored on a 13-yard run.

In the September 1951 Sun account, staff writer Edwin H. Brandt wrote: “City scored again after two minutes of the second quarter had gone by when Gene [sic – Carl] Fisher, Westminster quarterback, fumbled ... twice in a row. City recovered the second on the 9-yard line and [two plays later] Chuck Doering plunged over …”

Westminster made its bid to get back into the game,” Brandt continued, when “Fullback Al Kelbaugh got his shoulders over the goal line …”

In the third and final score of the game, “Quarterback Jerry Sisson then went around end on the initial play of the last period for the touchdown.”

In this year’s rematch, Westminster is ranked second in the state, according to a Nov. 23 poll by The Sun, while City is ranked 11th.

Griffin pondered that the 2005 Owl football team, coached by Brad Wilson, may be one of the three best ever fielded by Westminster. The other two teams he mentioned were the 1976 team and 1950 squad, which went 9-1 for the season. (This writer would add the 1981 squad.)

In 1950, Quarterback Jack Bowersox was named “All-Maryland” and halfback Bob Settle and tackle Calvin Dutterer were named “All-County.”

The 1951 Owl yearbook notes that the success of the team “was the culmination of a great deal of work on the part of civic-minded citizens of Westminster…”

Today, many “civic-minded” citizens who know their football expect Westminster to go on to win the state championship after they settle a 54- year old score with City College.

Dr. Steers said he is looking forward to the game this Friday, and asked that The Westminster Eagle spread the word for 1951 team members to get in touch with him, so that they may meet at the VFW at 4:40 p.m. for dinner and attend the game together.

It’s a shame they’ll all witness City College lose.

Go Owls.

Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster. E-mail him at: kdayhoff AT carr dot org

©2004 MyWebPal.com. All rights reserved.
Contact us at webmaster@mywebpal.com
All other trademarks and Registered trademarks are property
of their respective owners.

Thursday, November 24, 2005

20051123 Happy Thanksgiving WE


Happy Thanksgiving WE

Westminster Eagle

“Happy Thanksgiving”

November 23, 2005 by Kevin Dayhoff (619 words)

Tomorrow is Thanksgiving. Please celebrate this holiday as quickly as possible before the ACLU finds out that it is an historic American event steeped in wholesome family values and files suit.

This Thanksgiving we have many things for which to be thankful. As with any holiday season, there are always the occasional anxieties and mishaps. Above and beyond the fact that this is the first Thanksgiving Martha Stewart is out of the big house and I for one, am quite concerned that she will show up for Thanksgiving dinner; this past week was long and tough.

Always wanting to be a gracious host and in honor of Ms. Stewart, I stayed up all night with Westminster Eagle editor Jim Joyner and Eagle reporter Heidi Schroeder and printed this edition of The Westminster Eagle on hand made paper. For ink, we used a mixture of white grapes and blackberries, which we picked and crushed last week just for fun.

Celebrating the beginning of the holiday season, I retrieved all the Christmas and Thanksgiving decorations out of the attic and set them in the front yard. I found a great old Santa Claus from the early 1900s, and promptly staked it prominently in the front yard.

I decided to set out paper bag luminaries in homage to Ms. Stewart. While testing the luminaries, the gosh darn lunch bag went up in flames; set fire to the leaves and torched Santa Claus. You’ll read all about it tomorrow in the newspaper: “Artist, formerly known as Mayor Burns Santa Claus At The Stake – Local Officials Outraged.”

Then I wanted to go cut a fresh Christmas tree. My old trusty chainsaw needs replacing and since it was my wife’s birthday last week, I decided to get her a chainsaw for her birthday. That’s when I found out that Maryland is considering a seven day waiting period on the purchase of a chainsaw. When I finally got to the Christmas tree lot – I was dismayed to find local environmentalists were protesting the cutting of Christmas trees this year.

Afterwards, in honor of Ms. Stewart, I traveled through town, (protected by a Salad Shooter and a big bag of hard carrots) and re-arranged the recyclables in everyone’s recycling bin. I arranged them in alphabetical order and according to the color of the front porch.

Speaking of carrots, for unknown reasons, squash is served in many households on Thanksgiving. As much as I like vegetables, one food that does not exist on the Dayhoff’s Nutrition Pyramid (DNP) is squash. God created the squash as a joke. The word “squash” is Native-American for “mud disguised as plant.” Numerous attempts to improve the mud-like taste and texture of squash with herbs and spices manage to get squash to taste like seasoned and spiced mud. Just say so no to squash.

On a serious note - Let our Thanksgiving be revealed in the compassionate support our community renders to fellow citizens who are less fortunate. As we begin the holiday season, let us reach out with care to those in need of food, shelter, and words of hope. May we remember our men and women in uniform, who are in harm’s way, defending our freedom to enjoy this great country and a safe holiday. As we gather with our families over a Thanksgiving meal, may we ask that we be given patience, resolve, and wisdom in all that lies ahead for our great nation.

On this Thanksgiving weekend, shop ‘till you drop and be ever thankful that we can laugh, enjoy our families, revel in our freedoms, celebrate our great community and be stronger because of our differences. From our house to yours: Happy halidaze!

You can have my squash.

Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster. E-mail him at: kdayhoff@carr.org
####

Wednesday, November 16, 2005

20051116 Business Associations, Marines and Veterans

Business Associations, Marines, and Veterans

(Includes a brief history of the beginnings of the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce)

This column first appeared in the Westminster Eagle on November 16, 2005

http://news.mywebpal.com/news_tool_v2.cfm?pnpid=978&show=archivedetails&ArchiveID=1147786&om=1

This version is only different in that I added the footnote for the July 25th, 1924 Democratic Advocate article that I reference in the column…

November 16, 2005 by © Kevin Dayhoff (646 words)


There have been several events in the last several weeks that have kept me busy answering questions. In this short amount of space I’ll try and answer everyone’s questions.

“When did the Chamber of Commerce begin?” The first meeting of the Westminster Chamber of Commerce took place on Wednesday, July 23, 1924. This organization became the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce on January 1, 1973.

According to an article in the Democratic Advocate on July 25, 1924
[1], T. W. Mather, Jr., Charles W. Klee and C. Edgar Nusbaum called a meeting of “75 citizens” at the Westminster Fire Hall on Wednesday afternoon, July 23, 1924 “to consider and hear the views of the business men as to the advisability of forming a Chamber of Commerce for this city.” Officers elected during the meeting were: President, C. Edgar Nusbaum; Vice President, Miller Richardson; Executive Committee, Joseph Mathias, Carroll Albaugh, D. S. Gehr, W. H. Davis, William N. Keefer, Joseph E. Hunter and T. W. Mather, Jr.

Yes, according to a history of the Chamber written by Diana Scott, the Chamber did, at one time, maintain an office in Westminster City Hall. I should also note that the Carroll County Public Schools also maintained their offices in City Hall many years ago.


More research is needed as to what was the first “business association” in Carroll County? The Chamber was formed 26 years after another business organization in Westminster called the “Retailers' Association of Westminster, Maryland” formed on April 6, 1898 “for the purpose of the development and growth of the city and for mutual protection” against the railroad.


On April 9, 1898, the Democratic Advocate mentions that after the first meeting of the Retailers’ Association, a second meeting was to take place Monday, April 11, 1898. Of note is the fact that members of the “Merchants and Manufacturers Association” were invited. Apparently this association pre-dated the Retailers’ Association? A quick review of a Westminster directory published on January 1, 1887 by the Democratic Advocate, has no mention of any merchant’s association.

As for the many questions about Veteran’s Day: For this column, all this writer has to say about protesting for or against any war is that such protests are a cherished American right, for which men and women have made the ultimate sacrifice. Our First Amendment rights are their rights, too.

On Friday, October 3, 1862, The American Sentinel wrote a lengthy editorial commenting on the number of Carroll citizens who were seeking medical deferments to avoid the Civil War draft. The Sentinel referred to this phenomenon the "Democratic Anti-War Fever" and remarked: “It has never been known to prove fatal, nor even affect the appetite, but always resulting in a total destruction of the organ of patriotism.”


On the other hand, it was in April 1898 that the tension over the fate of Cuba erupted into the Spanish-American War. In an April 19, 1998 article in the Carroll County Times, Jay Graybeal wrote that “local reformer” Mary B. Shellman, Georgia Buckingham and Denton Gehr promoted the cause of “Free Cuba” in 1898 “in a play at the Westminster Odd Fellows Hall.”

As for a question about the U.S. Marine Corps birthday: it is the day before Veteran’s Day. On November 10, 1775 the Continental Congress commissioned Samuel Nicholas to raise several Battalions of Marines. Nicholas established a recruiting station at “Tun Tavern” in Philadelphia.

Yes, Carroll County does have a place in Marine Corps history. According to a July 7, 1996 article by Jay Graybeal in the Carroll County Times, on June 11, 1898, the first Marine killed in the Spanish-American War was from Carroll County. Sgt. Charles H. Smith was killed during the capture of Guantanamo Bay and “… buried with full military honors in Deer Park Methodist Cemetery near his parent's home in Smallwood…. More than 2,000 people attended the funeral.”

Next question?

Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster. E-mail him at:
kdayhoff@carr.org


####

[1] To Have Chamber Of Commerce—At the call of T. W. Mather, Jr., Charles W. Klee and C. Edgar Nusbaum, well known business men and boosters of Westminster, about 75 citizens from this city gathered at the Firemen's building, Wednesday afternoon to consider and hear the views of the business men as to the advisability of forming a Chamber of Commerce for this city. The meeting was opened by electing William T. Mather, Jr., temporary chairman, and J. Thomas Anders secretary. The chairman asked for the men to express themselves on the subject, which brought forth opinions of a number, which lead to the election of officers. The officers elected are to make plans and set the wheels in motion for a successful beginning of the organization. They are President, C. Edgar Nusbaum; Vice President, Miller Richardson; Executive Committee, Joseph Mathias, Carroll Albaugh, D. S. Gehr, W. H. Davis, William N. Keefer, Joseph E. Hunter and T. W. Mather, Jr. Democratic Advocate, July 25, 1924.

Sunday, October 16, 2005

20051015 Mar-Va Theatre Pocomoke City Maryland – October 15 2005



20051015 Mar-Va Theatre Pocomoke City Maryland – October 15 2005

October 15, 2005 by Kevin Dayhoff

Former Pocomoke City mayor Curt Lippoldt, a member of the Mar-Va Theater Board and former Westminster mayor Kevin Dayhoff talk over the progress of renovations of the old theater in downtown Pocomoke City. © Caroline Babylon photo – October 15, 2008.

Former Pocomoke City mayor Curt Lippoldt, a member of the Mar-Va Theater Board and Caroline Babylon look over the old Pocomoke City Mar-Va Theater. © Kevin Dayhoff photo - October 15, 2005.

The Mar-Va Theater which opened in 1927, with 720 seats, for vaudeville and silent movies; is being renovated. Once it re-opens it is sure to be a cultural and entertainment showcase for the Delmarva Peninsula. For more details go to
http://mar-vatheater.org/.

Caroline and I visited the Pocomoke City to review the renovation of the old theater on October 15, 2005, in order to prepare for making a presentation on the economic benefits of art and culture venues and programming, February 25, 2006 at the annual famous chicken and dumplings membership dinner, at the Pocomoke Fire Hall.

Everyone has a role to play in “Setting Delmarva's Stage for a Brighter Tomorrow.” Bringing to life the 1927 art-deco Mar-Va movie theater as an arts and cultural center in Pocomoke City can play a key and critical role in economic development, revitalization, and attracting community employment and tax base to the lower shore.

Kevin Dayhoff
www.kevindayhoff.net October 15, 2005

20051015 Mar-Va Theatre Pocomoke City Maryland – October 15 2005


Thursday, October 06, 2005

Urban sprawl is no good for all, but don't ignore the legal realities


Urban sprawl is no good for all, but don't ignore the legal realities

10/05/05 By Kevin E. Dayhoff

Recent articles and letters in local publications regarding water allocation, land use and municipal annexation are well intentioned - but clearly indicate a basic lack of understanding of the laws and past court decisions that govern these activities.

That's understandable, because since the early 1950s these areas of law in Maryland have be-come complex by bizarre, byzantine proportions.

In reality, many public officials don't understand the labyrinth of land use law, or they would be more careful about posturing in front of a public that is understandably clamoring for relief. Many pronouncements and promises are great for applause and votes, but woefully short on being legally possible.

In the end, often there is little a public official can do, retroactively, about water or property rights assigned to a property by a legal process put in place decades ago - unless they opt to spend valuable taxpayer dollars (losing) in court.

The next time anyone considers criticizing the City of Westminster about water allocation, bear in mind that you are preaching to the choir. Westminster painfully understands that it must find more water.

Also, understand that you are criticizing the wrong branch of government. For the most part, allocating Westminster's water was taken out of the hands of local officials, by the courts, almost 40 years ago.

In 1964, the city purchased the water system from a private company, which had historically provided water outside the city limits.

In 1966, the Maryland Court of Appeal (Bair v. Mayor and Council of Westminster, 221 P.2d 642 1966) declared the water system a "public utility" as opposed to a "municipal water supply" and made a ruling that forces the city to provide water to any property near any existing water line or "reasonably within its range of performance" - whether or not that property is annexed or in the city limits.

The 1966 Westminster water case is unique and is still used as national precedent. (In fact, it was used as recently as 1995 in a case before the Florida Supreme Court.) Attempting to overturn it may very well not be a wise use of taxpayer dollars.

As far as future land use, growth and development in Carroll County, planning needs to take place long before the housing development is in the public hearing stage or the subject of a costly moratorium.

A discussion needs to take place long before the business of a farm has been rendered unprofitable.

The debate needs to occur before a property owner has been awarded certain legal development rights - which can take the form of a legally enforceable contract, or in any event usually involves at least an implied contract between government and a property owner.

Sadly, the reactionary conversation - often involving unpleasant public hearings, uninformed conspiracy theories, political spinelessness and personal attacks - distorts and polarizes the collective discourse to such an extent that it renders many citizens skeptical about any discussion over growth and development.

The reality is this: You cannot take away a person's property rights or void a legal contract by plebiscite, politics or screaming mob.

That's just one of the reasons it is important that folks attend the community Grassroots Gatherings (http://www.carrollpathways.org/) that are scheduled for residents to get involved in the Carroll County Comprehensive Plan. Go, and ask questions. Many of Carroll County's public servants are the brightest land-use experts in the state.

We may not be able to do much about past land use contracts and court decisions, but the future is up to us. For the sake of that future, a majority of Carroll County residents long for a sober, clearly-worded, intelligent and nonpolitical explanation of farm profitability and the legal issues involving development and growth.

If we don't have that discussion now, our environmental future and the future of our green Carroll County way of life will be history.

Kevin Dayhoff may reached at kevindayhoff AT gmail.com or visit him at www.westminstermarylandonline.net


Kevin Dayhoff Art: www.kevindayhoff.com (http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/)

Thursday, September 29, 2005

Agriculture’s new social contract


Agriculture’s new social contract

September 29, 2005 by Kevin Dayhoff

More than ever, agriculture in Carroll County understands that, like it or not, it now has a new "social contract" with the greater community to operate.

Agriculture understands that simply feeding us, at prices below the cost of production, is not enough and that in today’s world; farmers are obligated with paying for and providing non-farming Carroll Countians with a great view and open space.

Well, I have a surprise for you. There is no such thing as a free lunch or a free view. This is a two way street and non-farmers also have a social contract obligation to become better informed about state mandated water and sewer master plan allocations, land use, zoning laws and the comprehensive planning process.

Economics, population pressure and market forces from outside of Carroll County are going to continue to drive up the value of farm land and ultimately we are all going to have to dig into our pockets and put more money into agricultural land preservation or pay for roads and schools and infrastructure. Read: Roads, schools and other infrastructure costs a great deal more then investing in agricultural land preservation.

For more information on these dynamics, please see two excellent columns written in the Carroll County Times by columnist Tom Harbold on August 30, 2005 and September 27, 2005.

The time to discuss future land use, growth and development in Carroll County needs to take place long before the housing development is in the public hearing stage or the subject of a moratorium. The discussion needs to take place long before the business of a farm has been rendered unprofitable or a property owner has been awarded certain legal development rights.

It is important that folks attend the community meetings, entitled Grassroots Gatherings (http://www.carrollpathways.org/), which are scheduled for residents to get involved in the Carroll County Comprehensive Plan. Go and ask questions. Many of Carroll County’s public servants are the brightest land use experts in the state.

Folks need to comprehend that a contract is an agreement between two parties in which both parties have obligations. Unless we want many of these great views to become great houses, we are all going to have to contribute.

The end users of agricultural products are now so far removed from the actual production of food that the public is no longer familiar with the day-to-day struggles of food production.

Non-farmers seem unwilling to give farmers any logical leeway in understanding a farmer's stewardship for the environment; the impact on profitability of increased regulations and bureaucratic expense or how a farm is to remain profitable in the face of increased urbanization.

Many agree that Carroll County is no place for urban sprawl development in the middle of farmland, far from any municipal infrastructure. Not only for the obvious reasons, but because most of the folks who move into these developments are horrible neighbors for farmers and contribute to the domino affect of the farm next to it becoming unprofitable and ultimately sold, for you guessed it, more houses.

We can start by increasing the funding for agriculture land preservation and increasing the funding of the Maryland Cooperative Extension Service, both of which are the immediate life preservers for the business of agriculture in the state.

If we can fully fund the $1.3 billion Thornton school aid plan, we can fully fund the Maryland Cooperative Extension Service and agricultural land preservation. If Maryland can use its bond rating for a low interest loan program for first time homebuyers, we can bond out a low interest-borrowing program for first time farm buyers.

Most Carroll Countians certainly understand that “more” houses means more schools, roads and infrastructure, and increased demand for government services and before too long, someone wants into our pockets to raise our taxes to pay for it all.

Market forces and population pressure from outside of Carroll County are going to continue to drive up the value of the land and ultimately we are all going to have to dig into our pockets and put more money into agricultural land preservation or spend a greater amount for roads and schools and infrastructure.

Meanwhile, the more farms that are put out of business, the more we increase development pressure by way of putting that many more acres of land on the market for growing houses instead of food.

In the next 20 years, Maryland's population will increase by another million. Not all one million new folks have to live in Carroll County, but if we make the land available, they will come.

Here’s where the conversation slips into “The Twilight Zone.” Friends take me aside and tell me; “Kevin, people gotta live somewhere.” My response is that they all don’t need to live in Carroll County. Development needs to take place in municipalities because that is where the infrastructure is but the new houses don’t pay for the increased infrastructure needed and the increased demand for services.

I believe that incentives, such as fast-tracking need to be in place to encourage commercial and employment tax base development in the municipalities so as to provide revenue stream. But when one approaches Mr. or Mrs. Nimby and say how about an employment campus so that you don’t have to travel so far on inadequate roads for a meaningful job, the answer is I want it to be a farm. Well, the tract of land in question, farming is not profitable and can’t pay the bills so that it can remain a farm. Most likely because you hassled the farmer or killed a bunch of her cows by throwing your trash into her hayfield.

You go to the developer and say, how about developing an employment campus, with high end architectural and design standards and lots of trees and landscaping. The developer says I can’t because it is not zoned for that and I can’t get the zoning changed because the neighborhood became an angry mob when that idea was suggested.

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(Originally from: 20050909 Outtakes Civility Listening session Gathering Places - C:\Media20040630WE\20051005 WE ListSessionP2 Urban Sprawl Hurts us All)

20050929 Agricultures new social contract




Kevin Dayhoff Art: www.kevindayhoff.com (http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/)

Saturday, September 24, 2005

20050923 Mr Moose with bagel flying home from San Diego CA


Mr Moose with bagel flying home from San Diego CA

September 23, 2005 Kevin Dayhoff

Mr. Moose enjoys a bagel while flying home from San Diego, California.

20050923 Mr Moose with bagel flying home from San Diego CA



Kevin Dayhoff Art http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/

Monday, September 19, 2005

Kevin and Mr Moose in San Diego California


Kevin and Mr Moose in San Diego California

The Adventures of Mr. Moose

September 18, 2005

Kevin and Mr. Moose take a moment to rest in the shade in San Diego, California, September 18, 2005

20050918 SD Southpark KED Moose
Kevin Dayhoff www.kevindayhoff.net http://kevindayhoff.blogspot.com/ Kevin Dayhoff Art http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/

Thursday, September 08, 2005

20050907 If technology Available Why Not WiFi?


If technology available, why not Wi-Fi?

http://news.mywebpal.com/news_tool_v2.cfm?pnpid=978&show=archivedetails&ArchiveID=1132527&om=1

Westminster Eagle

09/07/05 By Kevin E. Dayhoff

I've been fascinated with public Wi-Fi and all the possibilities it can provide Carroll County.


On Aug. 15, Silver Spring, in Montgomery County, announced that it now has public Wi-Fi - this put my random access memory into overdrive.


Wi-Fi (wireless fidelity) is a wireless high-frequency local area network that provides Internet access.


In June 2004, Newsweek previewed a sampling of 10 places in the world that are currently utilizing Wi-Fi. What caught my attention was the example of Hermiston, Ore., where the service covers 600-square-miles for a population of 13,200.


Can you imagine what it would be like to be anywhere in Carroll County and be able to go online for directions, restaurant menus or just to have access to information about all the exciting shops and businesses in the area?


Or download the latest corrections to your PowerPoint presentation from Bangalore, India, just before a meeting - just by powering up your laptop, Web browser enhanced cell phone, PDA or even a hand-held game device?


With the talent we have in Carroll, I would say that if it can be done in Hermiston, Oregon or Montgomery County, we could do it too.


Montgomery County is in the middle of an aggressive Wi-Fi initiative. The county is starting with the higher population areas first and then steadily expanding the coverage. The same approach would work in Carroll.


Alisoun Moore, Montgomery County Department of Technology Services Chief Information Officer, said that in Silver Spring, 10 unobtrusive antennae located on traffic signals, light poles and buildings provide the Wi-Fi service. This serves all downtown Silver Spring, (which is larger than the Main Street area of Westminster from Washington Road to McDaniel College).


Remember years ago when Silver Spring was a nondescript stretch of bypassed suburbia? Not so anymore. Go visit www.silversprung.com/home.html and see for yourself.


An Aug. 15, a Montgomery County press release stated, "The redeveloped Downtown Silver Spring, known as a hotspot for entertainment, dining and shopping, now is also a hotspot for wireless internet accessÉ


"The Community Wi-Fi initiative is designed to É (provide) no-cost community Internet access where it currently does not exist - in our open-air public places. É This endeavor demonstrates Montgomery County's commitment to the substantial benefits that broadband information access bringsÉ"


When I asked Moore how Montgomery County did it, the first words out of her mouth were music to my ears: "It's a private-public partnership. The county has very little money in it."


Atlantech Online provides the technical component in return for a $1,700 per year fee from the county. Atlantech is a local Internet Service Provider and for them it's a marketing piece.


Moore noted that, "Montgomery County did not want to get anyway near É competing with the private sector." This service is for public areas only.


Montgomery County Executive Doug Duncan said in a release, "The successful revitalization of downtown Silver Spring is a national model for urban redevelopment. After years of delays, I am proud that we were able to break the gridlock and get this project moving.


The area is now an arts and entertainment destination in the Washington, D.C. region, and our Wi-Fi agreement ensures that Silver Spring will remain on the cutting edge."


The consensus of an informal survey conducted locally was, yeah, there are questions to be answered; but let's roll up our sleeves and do it.


Wi-Fi presents unlimited opportunities for Carroll County.


Since the initiative would need to start in Carroll's municipalities, I contacted the Carroll County Maryland Municipal League Chapter President, Hampstead Mayor Haven Shoemaker.


Haven put it best: "I have many questions, but I'm willing to investigate any cost-effective private-public technology initiative that will stimulate economic development and quality of life for our citizens."


Taneytown Mayor Pro Tem Darryl Hale agreed, and Mount Airy Council President John Medve added that, "anything which enhances communication and access to government is a good thing."


I couldn't agree more.


Opportunities multiply once they are seized. The future is here, and Wi-Fi is a great opportunity for Carroll County.


Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster. E-mail him at: kdayhoff@carr.org.


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Wednesday, August 31, 2005

20050831 A New Hospital for Carroll County Westminster Eagle column



“A New Hospital for Carroll County

August 31, 2005 by Kevin Dayhoff (656 words)

I recently came across an old “Program of Dedication” for “Carroll County General Hospital”. It is dated “Two o’clock in the afternoon, Sunday, August 27th, 1961.”

We all take for granted our local hospital, but I remember a time when we didn’t have a local hospital.

The idea for a local hospital in Carroll was first discussed after the First World War. It was not until the 1950s, that the idea of raising money to build Carroll County General Hospital became a reality.

I asked Mr. and Mrs. Babylon about what they remember about the community coming together to build the hospital. Mrs. Babylon gave me an old file from the 1950s marked “Hospital.”

There were a number of wonderful “finds” in the file. One “find” was a very neat, carefully typed multi-page information packet entitled, “An Invitation To David Babylon To Help Provide The Hospital We All Need” from “Scott S. Bair Campaign Committee… Headquarters… 6 E. Main St… Phone # Tilden 8-8521.” It appears that it was individually typed. I wonder how many of these were produced? It must have been quite an effort. Unfortunately, the document is undated.

In this column, I’ll share with you some of excerpts from this campaign package. It gives us great insights of Carroll in the 1950s. Eight pages outline: “Everyone in Carroll County knows that we need a hospital of our own! Three things point out the need day after day! * our ever growing population ** our distance from other hospitals *** our ever increasing use of hospitals…It is inconceivable that a county of our size and progressiveness should continue any longer without a hospital of our own!”

“We need the hospital because of population growth. Our present population is close to the fifty thousand mark! Conservative estimates predict that… by 1970 it will be at least 62,000. According to United States Public Health Department standards a population of 50,000 needs 225 hospital beds. WE HAVE NONE!”

Our current population is 160,000.

“We need a hospital in Carroll County because all others are so far away. In emergencies or in maternities minutes can be important. Here is how far we have to go over heavily traveled highways…Gettysburg Hospital 25 miles Frederick 30 miles Hanover 20 miles Baltimore 32 miles. THEY ARE ALL TOO FAR AWAY IN ANY EMERGENCY!”

I was born in Frederick Memorial Hospital in 1953. Many of my friends were not born in a hospital or were born in Gettysburg, Hanover or Baltimore.

“We need a hospital because… In Carroll County in a single year physicians admitted [to other hospitals] the following types of patients. Maternity 1122 Surgery 2115 Medical 615 Extra-ordinary 231 Total 4083 …”

“To meet this urgent need and after careful study a fifty-bed general hospital is proposed as the first step…twenty-five beds for surgery. Twenty-five beds for maternity and medical cases. An emergency service department. Operating, Delivery, X-Ray…

“What will this cost? The first step – the fifty bed unit can be built for approximately one million dollars. It can be built for this relatively modest amount because: the site has been provided by the county without cost to the hospital…”

“Where will the money come from? From the county Tobacco tax funds and accumulated gifts $300,000. From the Federal Government Hill-Burton Hospital Construction Funds 350,000. From you and the other people of Carroll County 300,000. The campaign for 300,000 is now under way.”

Clip this column for reference because in the future I’ll gather some of the current statistics of the Carroll Hospital Center (as Carroll County General Hospital is now known) for some compare and contrast. I’ll share with you more of the great “finds” from this file and I’ll provide you with more pre-1961 history of Carroll’s forty years of work to build a hospital. In addition, as many folks have reminded me, I still owe you a column on the fascinating life of Dr. Theodore E. Woodward.

Kevin Dayhoff writes from Westminster. E-mail him at: kdayhoff AT carr DOT org

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